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Industry’s Victims in Bangladesh International attention has been focused on workers’ safety in Bangladesh since the disaster at Rana Plaza, a garment factory complex which collapsed in April, killing 1,132 workers. As concern runs high about the safety of garment workers, Reuters photographer Andrew Biraj spent time photographing survivors of the Rana Plaza collapse and also documenting the lives of workers in other industries in Bangladesh, where conditions can be hazardous. -Reuters ( 21 photos total ) Jesmin, a 25-year-old survivor from the collapsed Rana Plaza Building, lies on a bed at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP) in Savar, Bangladesh on June 4. Jesmin suffers from a spinal injury and is waiting for surgery.The April 24 collapse of the Rana Plaza complex, built on swampy ground outside Dhaka with several illegal floors, killed 1,132 workers and focused international attention on sometimes lax safety standards in Bangladesh’s booming garment industry.(Andrew Biraj/Reuters) 2 Workers sort clothes at a garment factory near the collapsed Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh on June 16. At least five different Bangladesh agencies have dispatched teams to start inspecting the country’s thousands of garment factories, but there has been little coordination between them.(Andrew Biraj/Reuters) # 3 A relative pours water on 25-year-old Rojina’s head at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP) in Savar, Bangladesh June 4. Rescue workers, who pulled Rojina from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, had to amputate part of her arm to rescue her. More than four million people, mostly women, work in Bangladesh’s clothing sector, which is the country�s largest employment generator, with annual exports worth $21 billion.(Andrew Biraj/Reuters) # 6 A man works in a stone crushing factory at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh on July 9. The stone crushing industry in the Burimari land port area of Lalmonirhat, in the north of Bangladesh, produces lime powder for various industrial purposes. According to a report by the Bangladesh Institute of Labour Studies, those working in the industry run the risk of contracting silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust. (Andrew Biraj/Reuters) # 7 Momin Ali, 26, shows an x-ray film of his lungs inside his house at Burimari in Lalmonirhat district, Bangladesh July 9. Ali says he suffers from silicosis, an incurable lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust, as he used to work in a stone crushing factory for two and half years.
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